Quick Quote

July 31, 2006

“A democracy cannot exist as a permanent form of government. It can only exist until the voters discover that they can vote themselves largesse from the public treasury. From that moment on, the majority always votes for the candidates promising the most benefits from the public treasury, with the result that a democracy always collapses over loose fiscal policy, always followed by a dictatorship.”

— Alexander Tyler


Good Speech

July 30, 2006

Remember James Traficant?

July 29, 2006

I sure do.
I remember his great little speeches on the floor of the House.
It could be said that he was a blogger before blogging existed.
Sure he was a Democrat. But he was my kind of Democrat.

I start posting some of his speeches when I have nothing else.

Starting, now:

SUPPORTING THE PRESIDENT’S TAX CUT
February 6, 2001
Mr. Speaker, there are opponents trying to kill President Bush’s tax cut. They say it is too big, it is not targeted. They say it is even retroactive.
Now, if that is not enough to glorify a 1040, they say they are upset because all Americans would get a tax cut.
Beam me up, Mr. Speaker. I support the pro-American, pro-worker, retroactive tax cut of President Bush.
Let me say this, Congress: there are not two or three United States of America, there is just one; one people, under God. And one tax cut that qualifies for all of America strengthens our Republic.
I yield back the fact that we have a Tax Code that would give Hulk Hogan a hernia.


North Dakota – Curing Global Warming

July 28, 2006

Dakota Huseby posted an article about how some enviromentalist group says North Dakota has some of the worst polluting powerplants in the nation.

Based on a combined ranking across all four pollutant categories (SO2, NOx, CO2 and mercury), the three worst-scoring plants in the U.S. were in North Dakota, with the very worst – Basin Electric’s Leland Olds plant – coming in first based on a ranking of 35th for sulfur dioxide, 19th for carbon dioxide, 24th for nitrogen oxides, and 37th for mercury emission rates.
The balance of the top 10 dirtiest power plants based on the combined score consisted of: #2 Minnkota’s Milton Young in North Dakota; #3 Otter Tail’s Coyote in North Dakota; #4 South Mississippi Electric Power Association’s R. D. Morrow plant; #5 Reliant’s Shawville in Pennsylvana; #6 Southern Company’s E. C. Gaston in Alabama; #7 Northern States Power’s Riverside plant in Minnesota; #8 Southern Company’s Greene County plant in Alabama; #9 Central Louisiana Electric’s Dolet Hills plant; and #10 Progress Energy’s L.V. Sutton plant in North Carolina. The 12 states that are home to at least two of the 50 dirtiest power plants were: Indiana (5); Alabama (4); Kentucky (4); North Dakota (4); Ohio (3); Pennsylvania (3); Texas (3); Iowa (3); Illinois (2); Nebraska (2); New Jersey (2); and Wyoming (2).

Interestingly, Nobel laureate Paul Crutzen
says “One way to curb global warming is to purposely shoot sulfur into the atmosphere.”

Now, people smarter than me can contradict me on this, but aren’t we already doing with out coal fired powerplants in North Dakota?

This Crutzen guy is definately an alarmist

“Given the grossly disappointing international political response to the required greenhouse gas emissions, … research on the feasibility and environmental consequences of climate engineering of the kind presented in this paper, which might need to be deployed in future, should not be tabooed.”

Clearly this fellow is a comrade of Al Gore, who interestingly has been distancing himself from the Democrats and aligning with Greens. But if sulfur is the answer to global warming, North Dakota is ahead of the game.

As I wrote some time ago.

We here in North Dakota have gotten to the point where we are dependent on the money that the energy industry has pumped into the economy. This is great, I would never say anything bad about the fact that this industy has been good for the economy and the income levels in this state. But high paying jobs are not enough.

It has always been my feeling that there isn’t nearly enough conservation within the conservative movement.

This state should make a concerted effort to not only be energy independent and self sustaining, but also a ‘clean’ or ‘green’ state, whichever your political leanings tell you is better.

North Dakota’s economic success should not be at the cost of its clean air and its children’s respiratory health.

What many people here in “fly-over” country need to realize is that the reason these Lefist Elites are constantly harping on these issues is because they have chosen to live in these cities which really are toxic stews.

Go to any city with an actual population and you will understand. The air sucks. Goto a place like D.C. and its like a blanket over your face. Point is these elites assume the whole world is like the way their cities are.

One of the best things about coming back to North Dakota after being to a place like that is to actually be able to breathe the air. Like many things in North Dakota, we don’t appreciate it until we leave.

With all that said, we must remember this: conservatism cannot be genuine without conservation. Whether it is fiscal, social, or enviromental – conservatism is hollow without conservation.


Re-run: North Dakota’s Air, Formerly Known as Clean

July 28, 2006

I’ve travelled the country. I’ve been to the the big cities. The air sucks. Goto a place like D.C. and its like a blanket over your face. North Dakota’s air is still very clean by those standards.

That said, this state must stop selling its soul and whoring itself out to the energy producers that are pretty much the entire basis for our economy at this point.

We here in North Dakota have gotten to the point where we are dependent on the money that the energy industry has pumped into the economy. This is great, I would never say anything bad about the fact that this industy has been good for the economy and the income levels in this state. But high paying jobs are not enough.

Teddy Roosevelt came to North Dakota for the clean and open air that was not in New York City and was literally killing him in NYC. Luckily there isn’t much pollution out west, but in the Mercer County (where I grew up) and the Bismarck area the air is not nearly what it should be.

I am not a tree hugger. Typically, can’t stand enviromentalist wacko’s who think of everything in terms of ‘enviromentally friendly.’

Rather, this issue should be looked at from the point of view of ‘human friendliness.’

North Dakota is a conservative state, as am I a conservative person. But it has always been my feeling that there isn’t nearly enough conservation within the conservative movement.

This state should make a concerted effort to not only be energy independent and self sustaining, but also a ‘clean’ or ‘green’ state, whichever your political leanings tell you is better.

North Dakota’s economic success should not be at the cost of its clean air and its children’s respiratory health.

Conservatism cannot be genuine without conservation; whether that is fiscal, social, or enviromental.


Walter Williams is Mad

July 26, 2006

From Human Events:

The House of Representatives voted 245 to 159 to pass the Internet Gambling Prohibition Act of 1999. Because of a rule requiring two-thirds approval, the measure didn’t pass. Its sponsor, Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., plans to introduce it again when only a majority is needed for passage.

There is absolutely no constitutional authority for this disgusting abuse of federal power. But most Americans, who think Congress has a right to do anything for which they can get a majority vote, ignore the clearly written constitutional restraints on Congress.

The key restraint here is the Tenth Amendment, which holds that all powers not enumerated in the Constitution belong to the people and the states. Of course, congressmen might pretend they have such authority under the “commerce clause,” their standard excuse to grab power.

If the Internet Gambling Prohibition Act is approved, it will become a precedent for congressional control over other aspects of the Internet and an important loss in our liberty. Let’s follow the money and ask who benefits should the law be passed. What about legal gambling establishments in Las Vegas, Atlantic City and elsewhere? From their revenue point of view, they’d be happy to see less online gambling competition.

If people want to gamble online, they are going to gamble online. The only thing the act will accomplish is, like Prohibition, make criminals out of otherwise law-abiding people. It will turn banks and other financial institutions into government snoops. Rep. Barney Frank, (D.-Mass.) said, “If an adult in this country, with his own money, wants to engage in an activity that harms no one, how dare we bar it.” I second that and add, since protection of “the children” often serves as an excuse to restrict our liberties, that if children get involved, let their parents, not Congress, deal with it.

Read the rest.

It’s a good case of how the social conservatives run the party, and the fiscal conservatives just didn’t show up.


Scooby Doo, where are you?

July 25, 2006

Tis a mystery afoot. Unbeknownst to many people is the identity of this dark figure. Here is what we know so far from Dana Milbank at the Washington Post

The candidate, immersed in one of the most competitive Senate races in the country, sat down to lunch yesterday with reporters at a Capitol Hill steakhouse and shared his views about this year’s political currents.

He is quoted as saying:

  • On the Iraq war: “It didn’t work. . . . We didn’t prepare for the peace.”
  • On the response to Hurricane Katrina: “A monumental failure of government.”
  • On the national mood: “There’s a palpable frustration right now in the country.”
  • The kicker?

    “It’s all fairly standard Democratic boilerplate — except the candidate is a Republican . And he’s getting all kinds of cooperation from the White House, the Republican National Committee and GOP congressional leaders.

    Not that he necessarily wants it. “Well, you know, I don’t know,” the candidate said when asked if he wanted President Bush to campaign for him. Noting Bush’s low standing in his home state, he finally added: “To be honest with you, probably not.”

    Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-Tenn.) says of the candidate:

    “He’s the best!”

    There are many more clues at The Washington Post.

    If it weren’t for the first hint that the mystery figure was running for reelection, I would have said it was John Thune of South Dakota.

    As reported at FreeRepublicans.com last Friday afternoon, John Thune says “put me in charge, and stay away from Bush”

    “If I were running in the state this year, you obviously don’t embrace the president and his agenda,” Thune told reporters at the National Press Club. He said the Iraq war is Bush’s biggest problem.

    “The first thing I’d do is acknowledge that there have been mistakes made,” he said. “Our candidates have to draw and point out differences in how they would approach and win the war in Iraq and how their opponents would. The biggest thing we have going for us on that issue is that Democrats are very divided.”

    “Clearly we are facing a headwind if you look at the national political environment,” Thune said. “The president’s numbers in most places aren’t good … these are going to be tough races to win.”

    “What our candidates have to effectively do is make it about a choice,” he said. “Who can move forward with a positive agenda?”

    Meanwhile, I gotta buy another bag of Scooby Snacks.