See, Democrats can take a stand on an issue

Rick Gion, Communication Director for the North Dakota Democratic Party has taken an important stance.

This stance appears in the OFFICIAL BLOG of the North Dakota Democratic Party.

Here’s what he says on this important issue:

It gets even better! Dustin Gawrylow, North Dakota and Iowa right wing political operative, had this to say on his blog.

Last Friday night (July 28th) the House voted on the “Estate Tax and Extension of Tax Relief Act.” The Republican Majority had decided to attach an increase to the Minimum Wage as a way to ease the Estate Tax cut through Congress. With no help from our representative, the bill passed (230-180) to pave the way to a three-year implementation of a $7.25 minimum wage; the first increase since 1997. While our representative’s vote would not have changed the outcome, it does give us a great glimpse into his motivations.

The bottom line is the minimum wage needs to be increased, and Republicans are playing politics by creating double sided legislation as political stunts. Folks like Gawrylow are rubberstamping this stunt by Republicans in Washington, D.C. by spinning it out of control and making baseless attacks. Legislation for a minimum wage increase should not be attached to any stipulations.

I knew Narloch, Port and Gawrylow were Kool Aid drinkers, but now I think someone put something in it!

That’s right, the North Dakota Democratic Party is calling me out.

Mr. Gion, unlike some Republicans in the state, I am more than prepared to make my argument.

One of the nice things about blogs is it saves the past articles.

On April 14th of this year I wrote this:

Ardent free market advocates are correct in arguing that the wage support that is the minimum wage creates artificial unemployment. The economics prove that if the minimum wage were abolished, that there would be no unemployed Americans. The downside of their argument is that Americans would be working for 10 cents per hour somewhere.

Obviously this is unacceptable, which is why labor laws were created in the late 19th and early 20th centuries; labor laws that included limitations on child labor as well as the Federal Minimum Wage.

While some may argue that this was the beginning of socialistic economic planning, it should be clear to most that letting corporations have free reign on their labor forces was not working.

Which brings us to the current situation: The Federal Minimum Wage has been set a $5.15/hr since 1997. However, most states have exceeded this Federal Minimum. Minnesota has increased its wages to $6.15. Which has put pressure on the Fargo economy as workers can cross the river for a better wage.

Opponents of a higher minimum wage argue that the minimum wage is something only teenagers earn. Fine, let’s limit the increase to those members of the workforce over 18 years of age. Those under 18 will still be protected by the Federal Minimum.

The fact is, if we are to have a minimum wage, it should be at a level that a person can sustain a living.

What should the minimum wage be set at?

Since the current rate of $5.15 was set in 1997 we have had fairly low inflation, roughly 3% inflation on the annual rate from 1997 to 2005. Since any legislation during the 2007 biennium would not take effect till August 1st, 2007 at the earliest. That will equate to a 10 year period. $5.15 at 3% compounded yearly for 10 years equals $6.92. Thus, setting the North Dakota minimum wage at $7.00/hr as of August 1st, 2007 would be economically supported.

The inflation has already occurred in the economy. If we are to have a minimum wage, it must keep up with the economic conditions or else those workers who rely on these lower paying job will continue to lose purchasing power, and the economy will stagnate.

On Tuesday I wrote:

Rep. Earl Pomeroy, our lone voice in the House of Representatives, fancies himself a “progressive.” He touts himself as a “fighter for North Dakota.” I know real progressives. Each and every one of them is in favor of boosting the wages of working North Dakotans.

Last Friday night, the House voted on the Estate Tax and Extension of Tax Relief Act. The Republican majority had decided to attach an increase to the minimum wage as a way to ease the estate tax cut through Congress. With no help from our representative, the bill passed (230-180) to pave the way to a three-year implementation of a $7.25 minimum wage, the first increase since 1997. While our representative’s vote would not have changed the outcome, it does give us a great glimpse into his motivations.

He could have easily voted in favor of this bill, just as his colleague Colin Peterson just over the river in Minnesota did, and not face retribution within his party. The Republicans had the votes already, so it was like a freebie. But our representative did not do that. Instead, he chose to vote the party line because he thinks his seat is safe.

He chose to vote in favor of the type of class warfare the estate tax is about. With his vote, he told every North Dakotan earning the minimum wage “I would rather stick it to a handful of wealthy taxpayers than give you a raise.”

Our representative believes that we as North Dakotans will look past the fact that of his $1.2 million war chest, a mere $39,000 was raised here in North Dakota (source: OpenSecrets.org).

North Dakotans may look past that, but we will not look past the fact that he fell for a Republican ruse – hook, line and sinker. We must now question whether after 14 years in office, does he know how that game is played yet?

Mr. Gion, thank you for recognizing me as a player. While your views of me are distorted, I still take the fact that you and your party were so moved by my Letter that you would recognize me in such a loud way.

Believe it or not, that letter wasn’t boilerplate. I actually wrote that.

Mr. Pomeroy stepped in a trap set by Karl Rove. It was a political stunt, but Mr. Pomeroy stepped in it with both feet.

Mr. Gion, get used to writing about me. The Karvo Campaign was just the begining.

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