North Dakota Becomes First State to Legalize Industrial Hemp Production

StopTheDrugWar.org

Industrial hemp production becomes legal under North Dakota state law as of January 1, making it the first US state to do so. But while the state Agriculture Department is ready to start handing out licenses next month, it cautions potential farmers that they can’t actually begin growing hemp until they are licensed by the state and are approved by the federal government.

Given that the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) remains opposed to legalizing the production of the marijuana relative — the two plants are different cultivars of the cannabis plant, one grown for its oils, seeds, and fibers and the other to get you high — North Dakota wheat, beet, and soybean farmers probably shouldn’t be thinking about switching over anytime soon. That despite the fact that their cousins on the other side of that line in the trackless prairie that marks the US-Canada border in the area are growing it like crazy, sending it across the border, where it can be processed and sold as hemp products, and taking their US dollar profits back home.

“Hopefully, North Dakota will be the first state where producers can grow hemp for legitimate uses. Nobody has ever put something like this in front of the DEA,” he said. “We want to make industrial hemp happen. We have put these rules together in such an airtight fashion that we know we are not going to have illicit drugs being grown in North Dakota,” Johnson said.

The DEA doesn’t care. Hemp contains traces of THC and thus falls under the purview of the Controlled Substances Act, DEA Washington spokesman Steve Robertson told the AP. “There is no differentiation between hemp and marijuana,” Robertson said. “The regulations for hemp are the same as they are for marijuana.” [Ed: Robertson of course is lying — yes, lying — the CSA clearly gives DEA the authority to grant hemp growing licenses.]

Well see if Conrad and Dorgan can’t get this done for North Dakota farmers.

Beyond rope and paper, hemp has potential for further ethanol production.

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